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Hypereosinophilic syndrome: a rare cause of ST-elevation myocardial infarction and thrombus formation on the aortic valve.

BMJ Case Reports 2024 April 17
We present a case of a man in his 30s presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and eosinophilia. The patient underwent thrombus aspiration and initially echocardiographic evaluation was normal. The patient was discharged after 2 days, but was hospitalised again after 6 days. Echocardiographic evaluation now revealed a thrombus formation on the aortic valve. Laboratory data revealed increasing eosinophilia, and treatment with high-dosage corticosteroids and hydroxyurea was initiated as eosinophilic disease with organ manifestations could not be precluded. Eosinophils normalised and the patient was discharged again. The combination of hypereosinophilia and absence of infection, rheumatological disorders and malignancy, led to reactive or idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome being the most plausible diagnoses. The patient was closely monitored in the cardiology and haematology outpatient clinics. Echocardiographic evaluation, performed 6 weeks after the patient was discharged, showed significant regression in the size of the thrombus mass.

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