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Multicenter registry study of cerebral venous thrombosis in china (RETAIN-CH): Rationale and design.

BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare cerebrovascular disorder that mainly affects young and middle-aged adults. Epidemiological data on the incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of CVT are lacking in China. In addition, there is a lack of evidence from large, multicenter, real-world studies on the efficacy and safety of endovascular.

AIM: To understand the incidence, diagnosis and treatment status of CVT in China and to estimate the effectiveness and safety of endovascular treatment in the real-world.

METHODS: A multicenter, retrospective observational cohort study will be conducted on CVT patient records from 104 hospitals, between January 1, 2018 and June 30, 2022, identified using a 2-stage cluster sampling design based on per capita gross domestic product. Each enrolled participant is required to complete a further follow-up, which includes the current situation and the assessment at 3 and 12 months after discharge.

STUDY OUTCOMES: The outcomes of this study will include the current status of the incidence, pathogenesis, etiology, clinical symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of CVT in China, as well as the effectiveness and safety of endovascular treatment in the real-world.

DISCUSSION: Results from this study will provide evidence on the incidence, specific risk factors, symptomatic and imaging features, and clinical outcomes of CVT in China as well as indicate whether endovascular treatment is superior to medical management alone for patients with acute CVT in the real-world.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: https://www.

CLINICALTRIALS: gov.

IDENTIFIER: NCT05448248.

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