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Visual omitted stimulus potentials are not retinotopic.

Neuroscience Letters 2024 April 14
Omitted stimulus potentials (OSPs) are elicited in response to the omission of expected stimuli and are thought to reflect prediction errors. If prediction errors are signaled in the sensory cortex, OSPs are expected to be generated in the sensory cortex. The present study investigated the involvement of the early visual cortex in the generation of OSPs by testing whether omitted visual stimuli elicit brain responses in a spatially specific manner. Checkerboard pattern stimuli were presented alternately in the upper and lower visual fields, and the stimuli were omitted in 10% of the trials. Event-related potentials were recorded from 33 participants. While a retinotopic C1 component was evoked by real visual stimuli, omitted stimuli did not produce any response reflecting retinotopy but did elicit a visual mismatch negativity, which was larger for omitted stimuli expected in the lower visual field than for those in the upper visual field. These results suggest that omitted visual stimuli are processed in a different pathway than actual stimuli.

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