Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Hepatitis C Exposure Diagnosis and Testing in Infants Born to Hepatitis C Virus-infected Mothers.

BACKGROUND: There has been a 5-fold increase in the number of cases of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among pregnant women, which is potentially associated with the increase in opioid use.

METHODS: This study was a retrospective review of infants born at a tertiary urban hospital in New Jersey, from January 1, 2011 to January 1, 2021, who were born to mothers with a prenatal diagnosis of HCV.

RESULTS: Of the 142 mothers with a prenatal diagnosis of HCV, 114 (80%) infants had a diagnosis of HCV exposure in the electronic health records. Of the HCV-exposed infants with follow-up data at 24 months of age, 52 (46%) were tested, with 34 of 52 (65%) receiving adequate testing. Infants documented as HCV exposed were more likely to be born to a mother with nonopioid drug use in pregnancy (P = 0.01) and have a higher birth weight (P = 0.03). Of tested infants, those with a higher number of well-child pediatrician visits (P = 0.01) were more likely to receive adequate testing. Trends showed more polymerase chain reaction testing than antibody testing for those who were inadequately tested.

CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of infants born to HCV-infected mothers were either not identified at birth (20%) or did not receive adequate testing on follow-up (35%). Further work needs to be done to improve documentation of HCV exposure at birth and follow-up testing to avoid missing congenitally acquired HCV.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app