Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Pattern of multiple human papillomavirus infection and type competition: An analysis in healthy Chinese women aged 18-45 years.

To assess the pattern of multiple human papillomavirus infection to predict the type replacement postvaccination. A total of 7372 women aged 18-45y from a phase III trial of an Escherichia coli -produced HPV-16/18 vaccine were analyzed at enrollment visit before vaccination. Hierarchical multilevel logistic regression was used to evaluate HPV vaccine type and nonvaccine-type interactions with age as a covariate. Binary logistic regression was construed to compare multiple infections with single infections to explore the impact of multiple-type infections on the risk of cervical disease. Multiple HPV infections were observed in 25.2% of HPV-positive women and multiple infections were higher than expected by chance. Statistically significant negative associations were observed between HPV16 and 52, HPV18 and HPV51/52/58, HPV31 and HPV39/51/52/53/54/58, HPV33 and HPV52/58, HPV58 and HPV52, HPV6 and HPV 39/51/52/53/54/56/58. Multiple HPV infections increased the risk of CIN2+ and HSIL+, with the ORs of 2.27(95%CI: 1.41, 3.64) and 2.26 (95%CI: 1.29, 3.95) for multiple oncogenic HPV infection separately. However, no significant evidence for the type-type interactions on risk of CIN2+ or HSIL+. There is possibility of type replacement between several pairs of vaccine and nonvaccine HPV type. Multiple HPV infection increased the risk of cervical disease, but coinfection HPV types seem to follow independent disease processes. Continued post-vaccination surveillance for HPV 51/52/58 types and HPV 39/51 types separately was essential after the first and second generation of HPV vaccination implementation in China.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app