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Body mass index and meniscal tears: Evidence from meta-analysis of observational studies and Mendelian randomization.

Obesity Reviews 2024 April 15
Obesity is a potential risk factor for meniscal tear (MT). We utilized meta-analysis of observational studies and Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses to elucidate the association between body mass index (BMI) and MT. In meta-analysis, a search was performed on June 27, 2022, using PubMed and Embase databases. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were extracted from included studies. In MR analyses, the research utilized summary-level data on BMI and MT obtained from Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits and the FinnGen Consortium, respectively. In meta-analysis, four studies comprising 826,383 participants were included. The pooled odds ratio of MT in the high BMI group was 1.32 (95% confidence interval, 0.83-2.09), compared with the nonhigh BMI group. The pooled odds ratio in the under 30 group was 1.76 (95% confidence interval, 0.61-5.03). In MR analyses, one standard deviation increase in genetically predicted BMI was associated with meniscus derangement as a chronic subtype of MT (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% confidential interval, 1.17-1.59). We found that a high BMI was not associated with an increased likelihood of MT based on meta-analysis of observational studies; however, by complementing MR analyses, we elucidated the causality of BMI increase on meniscus derangement as a chronic subtype of MT.

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