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Development of a wound epithelialization healing model: reducing the impact of contraction healing on the wound surface.

Animal experiments are important in trauma-related studies because they simulate in vivo effects. Rodents are a good choice for preparing trauma models; however, contractile healing in rodents results in a healing pattern that differs considerably from that in humans. Therefore, this study developed a new rodent model that avoids contractile healing of the skin around the wound using an anti-contraction ring, and the skin in the wound's center remains intact and acts as a source for epithelialized diffusion healing. Cell proliferation, migration, revascularization, and collagen secretion did not differ between the novel and conventional full-skin defect trauma models. However, the healing rate at various stages significantly differed between the two groups owing to differences in the healing patterns. And without effective treatment, the experimental group cannot heal. The stabilities of the novel and conventional methods were good regardless of operator or batch. In summary, this new animal trauma model provides a stable experimental environment similar to that in humans, which may promote trauma-related research.

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