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The Influence of Surgical Complexity and Center Experience on Postoperative Morbidity After Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology: Lessons Learned from the ROBOGYN-1004 Trial.

BACKGROUND: This study was a secondary analysis of the ROBOGYN-1004 trial conducted between 2010 and 2015. The study aimed to identify factors that affect postoperative morbidity after either robot-assisted laparoscopy (RL) or conventional laparoscopy (CL) in gynecologic oncology.

METHODS: The study used two-level logistic regression analyses to evaluate the prognostic and predictive value of patient, surgery, and center characteristics in predicting severe postoperative morbidity 6 months after surgery.

RESULTS: This analysis included 368 patients. Severe morbidity occurred in 49 (28 %) of 176 patients who underwent RL versus 41 (21 %) of 192 patients who underwent CL (p = 0.15). In the multivariate analysis, after adjustment for the treatment group (RL vs CL), the risk of severe morbidity increased significantly for patients who had poorer performance status, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.62 for the 1-point difference in the WHO performance score (95 % CI 1.06-2.47; p = 0.027) and according to the type of surgery (p < 0.001). A focus on complex surgical acts showed significant more morbidity in the RL group than in the CL group at the less experienced centers (OR, 3.31; 95 % CI 1.0-11; p = 0.05) compared with no impact at the experienced centers (OR, 0.87; 95 % CI 0.38-1.99; p = 0.75).

CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that the center's experience may have an impact on the risk of morbidity for patients undergoing complex robot-assisted surgical procedures.

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