Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Dietary patterns and carotenoid intake: Comparisons of MIND, Mediterranean, DASH, and Healthy Eating Index.

Nutrition Research 2024 March 22
The Mediterranean-Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) dietary pattern is associated with reduced cognitive decline and dementia risk. However, the nutrient features that distinguish the MIND from other patterns are unknown. We investigated the relationship between accordance to the MIND pattern and carotenoid intake (phytonutrients hypothesized to confer neuroprotection) relative to the Mediterranean, DASH, and Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2020). We hypothesized that MIND diet accordance would be a stronger predictor of carotenoid intake relative to other diet indices. A total of 396 adults (aged 19-82 years) completed the Dietary History Questionnaire to assess carotenoid intake and adherence to each diet index. Stepwise regressions with adjustment for covariates followed by the Meng's Z-test were used to compare correlation strength between each diet pattern and carotenoid. All diet patterns were positively associated with lutein and zeaxanthin, β-carotene, α-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin (all βs ≥0.38, Ps <.01). Effect size comparisons revealed that MIND accordance predicted a greater proportion of variance in lutein and zeaxanthin (all Zs ≥ 3.3, Ps < .001) and β-carotene (all Zs ≥ 2.6, Ps < .01) relative to the Mediterranean, DASH, and HEI-2020. MIND accordance explained a greater proportion of variance in α-carotene (Z = 3.8, P < .001) and β-cryptoxanthin (Z = 3.6, P < .001) relative to the HEI-2020. MIND diet accordance was disproportionately related to carotenoid intake, indicating the MIND index places greater emphasis on carotenoid-rich foods, particularly those containing lutein, zeaxanthin, and β-carotene, relative to other diet indices. Future research is needed to define the role of these carotenoids in nutritional interventions for cognitive health.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app