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Effect of Addition of Tannin Extract from Underutilized Resources on Allergenic Proteins, Color and Textural Properties of Egg White Gels.

Tannins, present in numerous plants, exhibit a binding affinity for proteins. In this study, we aimed to exploit this property to reduce the concentration of allergenic egg white proteins. Tannins were extracted, using hot water, from the lyophilized powder of underutilized resources, such as chestnut inner skin (CIS), young persimmon fruit (YPF), and bayberry leaves (BBLs). These extracts were then incorporated into an egg white solution (EWS) to generate an egg white gel (EWG). Allergen reduction efficacy was assessed using electrophoresis and ELISA. Our findings revealed a substantial reduction in allergenic proteins across all EWGs containing a 50% tannin extract. Notably, CIS and BBL exhibited exceptional efficacy in reducing low allergen levels. The addition of tannin extract resulted in an increase in the total polyphenol content of the EWG, with the order of effectiveness being CIS > YPF > BBL. Minimal color alteration was observed in the BBL-infused EWG compared to the other sources. Additionally, the introduction of tannin extract heightened the hardness stress, with BBL demonstrating the most significant effect, followed by CIS and YPF. In conclusion, incorporating tannin extract during EWG preparation was found to decrease the concentration of allergenic proteins while enhancing antioxidant properties and hardness stress, with BBL being particularly effective in preventing color changes in EWG.

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