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The Anti-Microbial Peptide Citrocin Controls Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms by Breaking Down Extracellular Polysaccharide.

Citrocin is an anti-microbial peptide that holds great potential in animal feed. This study evaluates the anti-microbial and anti-biofilm properties of Citrocin and explores the mechanism of action of Citrocin on the biofilm of P. aeruginosa . The results showed that Citrocin had a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of P. aeruginosa with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 0.3 mg/mL. All five concentrations (1/4MIC, 1/2MIC, MIC, 2MIC, and 4MIC) of Citrocin inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Citrocin at the MIC, 2MIC and 4MIC removed 42.7%, 76.0% and 83.2% of mature biofilms, respectively, and suppressed the swarming motility, biofilm metabolic activity and extracellular polysaccharide production of P. aeruginosa . Metabolomics analysis indicated that 0.3 mg/mL of Citrocin up- regulated 26 and down-regulated 83 metabolites, mainly comprising amino acids, fatty acids, organic acids and sugars. Glucose and amino acid metabolic pathways, including starch and sucrose metabolism as well as arginine and proline metabolism, were highly enriched by Citrocin. In summary, our research reveals the anti-biofilm mechanism of Citrocin at the metabolic level, which provides theoretical support for the development of novel anti-biofilm strategies for combatting P. aeruginosa .

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