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Altered static and dynamic functional brain network in knee osteoarthritis: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

NeuroImage 2024 April 11
This study aimed to investigate altered static and dynamic functional network connectivity (FNC) and its correlation with clinical symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). One hundred and fifty-nine patients with KOA and 73 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects (HS) underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and clinical evaluations. Group independent component analysis (GICA) was applied, and seven resting-state networks were identified. Patients with KOA had decreased static FNC within the default mode network (DM), visual network (VS), and cerebellar network (CB) and increased static FNC between the subcortical network (SC) and VS (p < 0.05, FDR corrected). Four reoccurring FNC states were identified using k-means clustering analysis. Although abnormalities in dFNCs of KOA patients have been found using the common window size (22 TR, 44 seconds), but the results of the clustering analysis were inconsistent according to the window sizes, suggesting dFNCs might be an unstable method to compare brain function between KOA patients and healthy control. These recent findings illustrate that patients with KOA have a wide range of abnormalities in the static and dynamic FNC, which provided a reference for the identification of potential central nervous therapeutic targets for KOA treatment and might shed light on the other musculoskeletal pain neuroimaging studies.

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