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Clinical experience of an adhesive bone conduction hearing system in children with congenital single-sided deafness.

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the effects of an adhesive bone conduction device (aBCD) in children with congenital single-sided deafness (SSD). Specifically, we examined whether the aBCD elicits improvement in the speech perception ability of children with congenital SSD and whether using this device would adversely affect the horizontal localisation abilities of these children.

METHODS: Thirteen school-aged children with SSD and seven children with Normal Hearing (NH) were included in this study. Speech perception in noise was measured using the Mandarin Speech Test Materials and sound localisation performance was evaluated using broadband noise stimuli (0.5-20 kHz), randomly played from seven loudspeakers at different stimulus levels (65-, 70-, and 75-dB SPL).

RESULTS: All children with SSD showed inferior speech perception and sound localisation performance compared with children with NH. The aBCD use remarkably improved the speech perception abilities of these children under quiet and noise conditions; however, their sound localisation abilities neither improved nor deteriorated.

CONCLUSION: This study reveals the effectiveness and safety of a non-surgical aBCD in paediatric patients with SSD. Our results provide a theoretical basis for early hearing intervention with an aBCD in children with congenital SSD who are temporarily unable to undergo ear surgery.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3.

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