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The impact of regular aspirin use on aneurysm recanalization rates after endovascular coiling.

OBJECTIVE: Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) pose a significant health risk, often leading to subarachnoid hemorrhage and severe neurological outcomes. Endovascular coiling has been a principal treatment method, but it comes with the challenge of high recanalization rates. Aspirin has recently emerged as a potential agent to reduce these rates. In this study, the authors aimed to investigate the impact of regular aspirin use on aneurysm recanalization rates following endovascular coiling in a 10-year single-institution study.

METHODS: A retrospective analysis was conducted on a dataset of 2236 aneurysms treated by a single neurosurgeon over a period of 10 years. The primary outcome measure was aneurysm recanalization, defined by a change in the Raymond-Roy Occlusion Classification of at least one grade.

RESULTS: A total of 525 aneurysms were coiled, 109 of which involved patients who reported regular use of aspirin. The recanalization rate was significantly lower in the aspirin group (9.2%) compared with the control group (23.6%) (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.15-0.66; p = 0.001). On analysis of the specific mechanisms of recanalization, aneurysm sac growth was less frequent in the aspirin group (5.5%) compared with the control group (18%) (OR 0.265, 95% CI 0.09-0.63; p = 0.002). Additionally, patients in the control group had a higher retreatment rate (18%) than patients in the aspirin group (5.5%) (OR 0.265, 95% CI 0.09-0.63; p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS: Regular use of aspirin appears to be associated with reduced rates of aneurysm recanalization after endovascular coiling. However, caution is advised in interpretation of these results given the retrospective nature of this study. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings.

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