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Influence of umbilical cord clamping time on cerebral oxygenation and early cardiac function in term infants.

BACKGROUND: Delayed cord clamping is the standard of care for both term and preterm infants worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 60-second or 180-second delayed cord clamping during labor on cerebral oxygenation and cardiac function.

METHODS: Healthy newborns were divided into two groups: a 60-second delay in cord clamping (60-s DCC) and a 180-second delay in cord clamping (180-s DCC) at birth. Pulse oximetry and cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy (cNIRS) probes were placed during postnatal care. A total of 84 healthy newborns were included in this study. Preductal oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate, and cNIRS values were recorded at 5 and 10 minutes after delivery. The cardiac function of the infants was assessed by echocardiography at 3-7 days postnatally.

RESULTS: There was no significant difference between the groups in SpO2 and cNIRS values at 5 and 10 min. While there was no significant difference in the number of neonates with targeted SpO2 at the 5th and 10th min and targeted cNIRS values at the 10th min, there was a significant difference in the number of neonates with target cNIRS values at the 5th min between groups (p <  0.001). Echocardiographic findings showed that pulmonary flow velocity was increased in the 180-s DCC group; the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.04).

CONCLUSION: Our results showed that the number of infants with normal cNIRS values regarding cerebral oxygenation was higher in the 180-s DCC group. The pulmonary flow velocity was significantly increased in the 180-s DCC group in terms of echocardiographic findings.

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