Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Survival outcome following surgical versus non-surgical treatment of colorectal lung metastasis-a retrospective cohort study.

PURPOSE: The optimal management of colorectal lung metastases (CRLM) is still controversial. The aim of this study was to compare surgical and non-surgical treatment for CRLM regarding the prognostic outcome.

METHODS: This retrospective single-center cohort study included 418 patients, who were treated from January 2000 to December 2018 at a German University Hospital due to their colorectal carcinoma and had synchronous or metachronous lung metastases. Patients were stratified according the treatment of the CRLM into two groups: surgical resection of CRLM versus no surgical resection of CRLM. The survival from the time of diagnosis of lung metastasis was compared between the groups.

RESULTS: Two- and 5-year overall survival (OS) from the time of diagnosis of lung metastasis was 78.2% and 54.6%, respectively, in our cohort. Patients undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy showed a significantly better 2- and 5-year survival compared to patients with non-surgical treatment (2-year OS: 98.1% vs. 67.9%; 5-year OS: 81.2% vs. 28.8%; p < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression revealed the surgical treatment (HR 4.51 (95% CI = 2.33-8.75, p < 0.001) and the absence of other metastases (HR 1.79 (95% CI = 1.05-3.04), p = 0.032) as independent prognostic factors in patients with CRLM.

CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that patients with CRLM, who qualify for surgery, benefit from surgical treatment. Randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm our findings.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRY NUMBER: The work has been retrospectively registrated at the German Clinical Trial Registry (DRKS00032938).

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app