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Temporal patterns of organ dysfunction in COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit: A group-based multitrajectory modelling analysis.

BACKGROUND: The course of organ dysfunction (OD) in Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients is unknown. Herein, we analyse the temporal patterns of OD in intensive care unit-admitted COVID-19 patients.

METHODS: Sequential organ failure assessment scores were evaluated daily within 2 weeks of admission to determine the temporal trajectory of OD using group-based multitrajectory modelling (GBMTM).

RESULTS: 392 patients were enrolled with a 28-day mortality rate of 53.6%. GBMTM identified four distinct trajectories. Group 1 (mild OD, n=64), with a median APACHE II score of 13 (IQR 9-21), had an early resolution of OD and a low mortality rate. Group 2 (moderate OD, n=140), with a median APACHE II score of 18 (IQR 13-22), had a 28-day mortality rate of 30.0%. Group 3 (severe OD, n=117), with a median APACHR II score of 20 (IQR 13-27), had a deterioration trend of respiratory dysfunction and a 28-day mortality rate of 69.2%. Group 4 (extremely severe OD, n=71), with a median APACHE II score of 20 (IQR 17-27), had a significant and sustained OD affecting all organ systems and a 28-day mortality rate of 97.2%.

CONCLUSIONS: Four distinct trajectories of OD were identified, and respiratory dysfunction trajectory could predict nonpulmonary OD trajectories and patient prognosis.

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