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The double-edged effect of social mobility belief on socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescents' health: The mediating role of intentional self-regulation.

PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the double-edged effect of social mobility belief on socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescents' mental and physical health and further explore whether intentional self-regulation is the common psychological mechanism of social mobility belief affecting physical and mental health.

METHOD: A total of 469 adolescents ( M age = 13.96 years, 49.3% boys) from two rural public schools in China were included in this study. Adolescents completed questionnaires measuring social mobility belief and mental health (life satisfaction, self-esteem, and depression). Physical health (allostatic load) was reflected by six indicators (resting diastolic and systolic blood pressure, body mass index, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol).

RESULTS: Social mobility belief was positively correlated with adolescents' life satisfaction and self-esteem but negatively correlated with depression. Intentional self-regulation mediated the relationships between social mobility belief and mental health. In addition, the results showed that intentional self-regulation mediated the relationship between social mobility belief and adolescents' physical health.

CONCLUSIONS: Social mobility belief may be a "skin-deep" resilience resource positively related to mental health but negatively correlated with physical health through intentional self-regulation among socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescents. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).

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