Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Icodextrin-induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis in a patient with peritoneal dialysis.

Nephrology 2024 April 11
Icodextrin has been widely prescribed for peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients with inadequate ultrafiltration, but icodextrin induced acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) has been not well recognized in clinical practice. We described a young-aged female with IgA nephropathy and end stage kidney disease under continuous automated peritoneal dialysis. She developed skin erythema with exfoliation over the groin 7th day after initiation of icodextrin based PD dialysate. Initially, her scaling skin lesion with pinhead-sized pustules affected the bilateral inguinal folds, and then it extended to general trunk accompanied by pruritus. She was admitted because of deterioration of skin lesion on 14th day of icodextrin exposure. She was afebrile and physical examination was notable for widespread erythematous papules with pruritus extending over her groins and trunk. Pertinent laboratory examination showed leukocytosis of 18 970 cells/μL with neutrophile count of 17 642 cells/μL (92.3%), and c-reactive-protein: 3.39 mg/dL. Skin biopsy revealed multifocal sub corneal abscess with papillary dermal edema, and upper-dermal neutrophilia with perivascular accentuation, consistent with the diagnosis of AGEP. After discontinuation of PD, she underwent temporary high-flux haemodialysis with treatment of steroid and antihistamine. Her dermatologic lesion resolved without any skin sequalae completely within 4 days, and she underwent icodextrin-free peritoneal dialysis at 17th day. This case highlighted the fact that icodextrin-induced AGEP should be early recognized to avoid inappropriate management.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app