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Investigating the Mechanisms of Intradermal Injection for Easier "Skin Booster" Treatment: A Fluid Mechanics Approach to Determine Optimal Delivery Method.

BACKGROUND: The use of "skin boosters" for rejuvenating aged skin is widely used. However, the accurate injection of the skin booster into the dermal layer remains a challenge due to the density of the dermis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal mechanical variables of delivery that enabled correct targeting of the product to the dermis for optimal results.

METHODS: We investigated the impact of mechanical variables (syringe diameter, needle diameter and length, and viscosity of the skin booster) on the force required for intradermal injection in porcine skin. The correlation between these variables and the injection force was examined as well.

RESULTS: The results show that smaller syringe diameters, larger needle diameters, shorter needle lengths, and lower viscosity of the skin boosters reduce the injection force needed for intradermal injections.

CONCLUSIONS: During the administration of skin booster injections, clinicians should take into account optimal conditions that facilitate intradermal injections, thus maximizing rejuvenating outcomes. Furthermore, manufacturers of skin boosters should formulate the products with decreased viscosity and provide the product in conjunction with appropriate needles and syringes, designed to optimize ease of injection.

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