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CXCL1 as a Potential Biomarker of Plaque Instability in Carotid Stenosis. Preliminary Report.

Angiology 2024 April 10
Biomarkers of atherosclerotic plaque instability are needed. This study aimed to evaluate the level of chemokine CXCL1 (CXC motif ligand 1) in plasma and atherosclerotic plaques in patients with carotid stenosis and correlate that with plaque morphology. The study group included 82 patients (30 women and 52 men) aged 50-90 years (mean 68.1 ± 8.9) who underwent elective carotid endarterectomy. The obtained atherosclerotic plaques were macroscopically and microscopically assessed according to the American Heart Association (AHA) classification. Fifty-one (62.2%) and 31 (37.8%) of the plaques were unstable and stable, respectively. The mean concertation of CXCL1 in plaques in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients was 0.00 (±0.00) vs 88.90 (±95.19) pg/ml, respectively ( P = 0.000). The mean plasma concentration of CXCL1 in the study group was 42.40 (±85.79) pg/ml, while in the control group (healthy volunteers without lesions in the carotid arteries) it was 0.00 pg/mL (±0.00) ( P = 0.000). The mean plasma CXCL1 concertation in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients was 22.08 (±49.13) versus 67.72 (±107.91) pg/ml, respectively ( P = 0.031). Significantly higher CXCL1 concentration in atherosclerotic plaques and plasma in symptomatic patients compared with asymptomatic patients probably resulted from unstable lesions in the carotid arteries.

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