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Specificities of the Management of perineal burns.

There is a paucity of articles addressing the management strategy for perineal burns. Pelvic floor burns present a multitude of problems. These relate to the management of stool, urine, areas of maceration, significant strain, and the risk of infection. The objective of this study was to analyze a consecutive series of perineal burns by studying their characteristics, treatment, and the management of urine and feces. This was a retrospective study including 100 patients between January 2018 and December 2022. The patients had all been hospitalized after suffering burns to the perineum. In 28% of the patients, the perineal burn was complicated by infection. In 61% of cases, a cutaneous infection, in 32% of cases, a urinary tract infection, in 25% of cases, a respiratory tract infection, and in 7% of cases, an infection of the digestive tract. Superinfection is associated with an increased risk of poor engraftment. 100% of the patients with poor or average engraftment had an infection in the aftermath of the burn, compared with 20% of the patients with excellent engraftment and 61% of the patients with good engraftment. In our series, the analysis revealed that, in 95% of cases, no specific procedures were implemented for stool management. Perianal involvement was associated with a risk of sub-excellent engraftment. The results were statistically significant, with p=0.005 and an OR=8.72 after multivariate analysis. We favor the least invasive approach to stool management. Indications for a rectal catheter arise in patients with the following characteristics: the patient must be sedated, the burns must be deep and close to the anal opening, and the stools must be watery and abundant. In 95% of cases, we do not install a stool management device. Colostomies should remain exceptional.

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