Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Blue sensitive sub-band gap negative photoconductance in SnO 2 /TiO 2 NP bilayer oxide transistor.

Nanoscale 2024 April 10
Large negative photoconductance (NPC) of SnO2 /TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) heterostructure has been observed with thin film transistor (TFT) geometry and has been investigated using sub-bandgap light (blue) illumination. This negative photoconduction has been detected both in accumulation and depletion mode operation, which effectively reduces the carrier mobility ( μ ) of the TFT. Moreover, the threshold voltage ( V th ) widely shifted in the positive direction under illumination. The combined effects of the reduction of mobility and V th shifting led to a faster reduction of On (or Off) state current under illumination. The negative photosensitivity of this system is as high as 3.2 A W-1 , which has been rarely reported in the earlier literature. Moreover, the variation of On (or Off) current, μ and V th shift is linear with low-intensity blue light. This SnO2 /TiO2  NP bilayer channel has been deposited on top of an ionic dielectric (Li-Al2 O3 ) that reduces its operating voltage of this TFT within 2 V. Furthermore, the device has achieved a saturation mobility of 0.4 cm2 V-1 s-1 with an on/off ratio of 7.4 × 103 in the dark. An energy band diagram model has been proposed based on the type-II heterostructure formation between SnO2 /TiO2 semiconductors to explain this NPC mechanism. According to the energy band diagram model, adsorbed H2 O molecules of TiO2 NPs created a depleted layer in the heterostructure that accelerated the recombination process of photo-generated carriers rather than its transport.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app