Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Cardiovascular outcomes in solid organ transplant recipients undergoing cardiac surgery: A matched pair analysis.

INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to compare postoperative outcomes after cardiac surgery in solid-organ transplant recipients and nontransplant patients.

METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of 78 consecutive transplant recipients who underwent cardiac surgery at Asan Medical Center between 2000 and 2022 and were matched with 312 nontransplant patients who underwent cardiac surgery at a 1:4 ratio. The outcomes included 30-day mortality, all-cause death, cardiac death, readmission, and cardiac readmission.

RESULTS: There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The most common type of cardiac surgery performed in solid organ transplant recipients was isolated valve surgery, followed by isolated CABG. The 30-day mortality was not significantly different between transplant recipients and nontransplant patients (3.9% vs. 3.5%; P > .99). Solid organ transplant recipients showed a higher all-cause mortality compared to nontransplant patients (29.1% vs. 14.3% at 5 years; P = .001); however, there was no significant difference in cardiac death between the two groups (2.6% vs. 3.2% at 5 years; P = .80). In addition, the readmission and cardiac readmission rates showed comparable findings to that of mortality.

CONCLUSION: Cardiac surgery can be performed safely in solid organ transplant recipients, with postoperative cardiovascular outcomes comparable to those observed in nontransplant patients.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app