Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

G6PD maintains the VSMC synthetic phenotype and accelerates vascular neointimal hyperplasia by inhibiting the VDAC1-Bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway.

BACKGROUND: Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) plays an important role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic switching, which is an early pathogenic event in various vascular remodeling diseases (VRDs). However, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood.

METHODS: An IP‒LC‒MS/MS assay was conducted to identify new binding partners of G6PD involved in the regulation of VSMC phenotypic switching under platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) stimulation. Co-IP, GST pull-down, and immunofluorescence colocalization were employed to clarify the interaction between G6PD and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1). The molecular mechanisms involved were elucidated by examining the interaction between VDAC1 and apoptosis-related biomarkers, as well as the oligomerization state of VDAC1.

RESULTS: The G6PD level was significantly elevated and positively correlated with the synthetic characteristics of VSMCs induced by PDGF-BB. We identified VDAC1 as a novel G6PD-interacting molecule essential for apoptosis. Specifically, the G6PD-NTD region was found to predominantly contribute to this interaction. G6PD promotes VSMC survival and accelerates vascular neointimal hyperplasia by inhibiting VSMC apoptosis. Mechanistically, G6PD interacts with VDAC1 upon stimulation with PDGF-BB. By competing with Bax for VDAC1 binding, G6PD reduces VDAC1 oligomerization and counteracts VDAC1-Bax-mediated apoptosis, thereby accelerating neointimal hyperplasia.

CONCLUSION: Our study showed that the G6PD-VDAC1-Bax axis is a vital switch in VSMC apoptosis and is essential for VSMC phenotypic switching and neointimal hyperplasia, providing mechanistic insight into early VRDs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app