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Is Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) Activity in Australia Consistent With International Guidelines?

BACKGROUND: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) did not receive regulatory approval in Australia until 2013, several years after Europe (2007) and America (2011). Consequently, the uptake of TAVI in Australia initially lagged behind international best practices. This study was undertaken to provide an update on the status of TAVI activity in Australia.

METHOD: A descriptive population-level epidemiological study was performed. Annual activity data for both surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) and TAVI were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) for the period from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2022. Dynamic contemporaneous population data were obtained from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Trends in absolute activity, population-adjusted activity and age cohort-adjusted activity were examined.

RESULTS: Despite the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Australian healthcare system, TAVI activity has continued to increase. Annual TAVI activity now exceeds annual SAVR activity (3,967 vs 3,870), albeit driven by TAVI in patients aged 85+ years. Population-adjusted TAVI activity now exceeds the reported European average (15.3 vs 14.1 per 100,000 persons). The point of equipoise for the choice between SAVR and TAVI is the 75-79 age cohort (50% vs 50%).

CONCLUSIONS: Australian TAVI activity is now consistent with international best practice.

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