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Racial-Ethnic disparities in stroke prevalence among patients with heart failure.

Racial-ethnic disparities exist in the prevalence and outcomes of heart failure (HF) and are presumed to be related to differences in cardiovascular risk factor burden and control. There is little data on stroke disparities among patients with HF or the factors responsible. We hypothesized disparities in stroke prevalence exist among patients with HF in a manner not fully explained by burden of cardiovascular disease. We analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2014). Cardiovascular profiles were compared by race/ethnicity. Using survey-weighted models, effect modification of the relationship between HF and stroke by race/ethnicity was examined adjusting for cardiovascular profiles. Of 40,437 participants, 2.5 % had HF. The HF cohort had a greater proportion of White and Black participants (77 % vs 74 % and 15 % vs 12 %, respectively) and fewer participants of Hispanic ethnicity (8 % vs 14 %). Stroke was 8 times more prevalent in HF (19.6 % vs 2.3 %, <0.001). Among individuals with HF, race-ethnic differences were identified in the prevalence and mean values of vascular risk factors but were largely driven by higher rates in Black participants. There was significant interaction between HF and race/ethnicity; HF increased the odds of stroke over 7-fold in participants of Hispanic ethnicity (aOR: 7.84; 95 % CI: 4.11-15.0) but to a lesser extent in Black and White participants (Black aOR: 2.49; 95 % CI: 1.72-3.60; White aOR: 3.36; 95 % CI: 2.57-4.40). People of Hispanic ethnicity with HF have a disproportionately higher risk of stroke in a manner not fully explained by differences in vascular risk profiles.

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