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Edaravone dexborneol attenuates cognitive impairment in a rat model of vascular dementia by inhibiting hippocampal oxidative stress and inflammatory responses and modulating the NMDA receptor signaling pathway.

Brain Research 2024 April 5
Exploring the intricate pathogenesis of Vascular Dementia (VD), there is a noted absence of potent treatments available in the current medical landscape. A new brain-protective medication developed in China, Edaravone dexboeol (EDB), has shown promise due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, albeit with a need for additional research to elucidate its role and mechanisms in VD contexts. In a research setup, a VD model was established utilizing Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, subjected to permanent bilateral typical carotid artery occlusion (2VO). Behavioral assessment of the rats was conducted using the Bederson test and pole climbing test, while cognitive abilities, particularly learning and memory, were evaluated via the novel object recognition test and the Morris water maze test. Ensuing, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), IL-1β, IL-6, IL-4, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined through Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Synaptic plasticity-related proteins, synaptophysin (SYP), post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor proteins (NR1, NR2A, NR2B) were investigated via Western blotting technique. The findings imply that EDB has the potential to ameliorate cognitive deficiencies, attributed to VD, by mitigating oxidative stress, dampening inflammatory responses, and modulating the NMDA receptor signaling pathway, furnishing new perspectives into EDB's mechanism and proposing potential avenues for therapeutic strategies in managing VD.

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