Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Localization of multiple opsins in ocular and non-ocular tissues of deep-sea shrimps and the first evidence of co-localization in a rhabdomeric R8 cell (Caridea: Oplophoroidea).

Vision Research 2024 April 6
Bioluminescence is a prevalent phenomenon throughout the marine realm and is often the dominant source of light in mesophotic and aphotic depth horizons. Shrimp belonging to the superfamily Oplophoroidea are mesopelagic, perform diel vertical migration, and secrete a bright burst of bioluminescent mucous when threatened. Species in the family Oplophoridae also possess cuticular light-emitting photophores presumably for camouflage via counter-illumination. Many species within the superfamily express a single visual pigment in the retina, consistent with most other large-bodied mesopelagic crustaceans studied to date. Photophore-bearing species have an expanded visual opsin repertoire and dual-sensitivity visual systems, as evidenced by transcriptomes and electroretinograms. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to describe opsin protein localization in the retinas of four species of Oplophoroidea and non-ocular tissues of Janicella spinicauda. Our results show that Acanthephyra purpurea (Acanthephyridae) retinas possess LWS-only photoreceptors, consistent with the singular peak sensitivity previously reported. Oplophoridae retinas contain two opsin clades (LWS and MWS) consistent with dual-sensitivity. Oplophorus gracilirostris and Systellaspis debilis have LWS in the proximal rhabdom (R1-7 cells) and MWS2 localized in the distal rhabdom (R8 cell). Surprisingly, Janicella spinicauda has LWS in the proximal rhabdom (R1-7) and co-localized MWS1 and MWS2 opsin paralogs in the distal rhabdom, providing the first evidence of co-localization of opsins in a crustacean rhabdomeric R8 cell. Furthermore, opsins were found in multiple non-ocular tissues of J. spinicauda, including nerve, tendon, and photophore. These combined data demonstrate evolutionary novelty and opsin duplication within Oplophoridae, with implications for visual ecology, evolution in mesophotic environments, and a mechanistic understanding of adaptive counter-illumination using photophore bioluminescence.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app