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Sleep disturbance in Angelman syndrome patients.

Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by abnormal expression of the maternal ubiquitin protein ligase E3A gene (UBE3A). As one of the most challenging symptoms and important focuses of new treatment, sleep disturbance is reported to occur in 70-80% of patients with AS and has a serious impact on the lives of patients and their families. Although clinical studies and animal model studies have provided some clues, recent research into sleep disorders in the context of AS is still very limited. It is generally accepted that there is an interaction between neurodevelopment and sleep; however, there is no recognized mechanism for sleep disorders in AS patients. Accordingly, there are no aetiologically specific clinical treatments for AS-related sleep disorders. The most common approaches involve ameliorating symptoms through methods such as behavioural therapy and symptomatic pharmacotherapy. In recent years, preclinical and clinical studies on the targeted treatment of AS have emerged. Although precision therapy for restoring the UBE3A level and the function of its signalling pathways is inevitably hindered by many remaining obstacles, this approach has the potential to address AS-related sleep disturbance.

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