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Influencing factors of kinesiophobia among stroke patients with hemiplegia: A mixed methods study.

OBJECTIVES: There is a scarcity of data regarding the effects of kinesiophobia on stroke patients with hemiplegia. Therefore, this paper aims to evaluate the level of kinesiophobia experienced by stroke patients with hemiplegia in China, examine the elements that influence it, and investigate the unique psychological experience of kinesiophobia combined with a qualitative study.

METHODS: This mixed study was conducted in two steps. Four approved scales were used to evaluate a total of 163 patients: (i) Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, (ii) Pain Catastrophizing Scale, (iii) Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale, and (iv) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. A multivariate linear regression model was used to evaluate the predictors of kinesiophobia in stroke patients with hemiplegia. Subsequently, semi-structured interviews with 15 stroke patients with hemiplegia were conducted using an objective sampling method, and the Colaizzi 7-step analysis process was utilized to analyze the interview data.

RESULTS: A total of 163 stroke patients with hemiplegia were included in this study, of them, 47.9% reported kinesiophobia. Multiple linear regression revealed that the influencing factors of kinesiophobia in stroke patients with hemiplegia were a history of falls, exaggeration, helplessness, anxiety, depression, and low exercise self-efficacy (P<0.05). The qualitative research focuses on two main topics: personal adoption of negative coping styles and insufficient external support.

CONCLUSION: Our study showed that the kinesiophobia in stroke patients with hemiplegia was high, with several factors influencing their kinesiophobia. Some of these factors are modifiable and should be considered when formulating kinesiophobia intervention strategies for stroke patients with hemiplegia.

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