Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Safety and risk assessment of psychedelic psychotherapy: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

Psychiatry Research 2024 March 32
Psychotherapies assisted by psychedelic substances have shown promising results in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate safety data in human subjects. We carried out a search on MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO databases between 2000 and 2022. Standardized mean differences between different dose ranges and between acute and subacute phases were calculated for cardiovascular data after psychedelic administration. Risk differences were calculated for serious adverse events and common side effects. Thirty studies were included in this meta-analysis. There were only nine serious adverse events for over 1000 administrations of psychedelic substances (one during the acute phase and 8 during the post-acute phase). There were no suicide attempts during the acute phase and 3 participants engaged in self-harm during the post-acute phase. There was an increased risk for elevated heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure for all dose range categories, as well as an increased risk of nausea during the acute phase. Other common side effects included headaches, anxiety, and decreased concentration or appetite. This meta-analysis demonstrates that psychedelics are well-tolerated, with a low risk of emerging serious adverse events in a controlled setting with appropriate inclusion criteria.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app