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Predictors of permanent pacemaker implantation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-the search is still on!

Several anatomical, demographic, clinical, electrocardiographic, procedural, and valve-related variables can be used to predict the probability of developing conduction abnormalities after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) that necessitate permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation. These variables include calcifications around the device landing zone and in the mitral annulus; pre-existing electrocardiographic abnormalities such as left and right bundle branch blocks (BBB), first- and second-degree atrioventricular blocks, as well as bifascicular and trifascicular blocks; male sex; diabetes mellitus (DM); hypertension; history of atrial fibrillation; renal failure; dementia; and use of self-expanding valves. The current study supports existing literature by demonstrating that type 2 DM and baseline right BBB are significant predictors of PPM implantation post-TAVR. Regardless of the side of the BBB, this study demonstrated, for the first time, a linear association between the incidence of PPM implantation post-TAVR and every 20 ms increase in baseline QRS duration (above 100 ms). After a 1-year follow-up, patients who received PPM post-TAVR had a higher rate of hospitalization for heart failure and nonfatal myocardial infarction.

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