Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

HES6 knockdown in human hematopoietic precursor cells reduces their in vivo engraftment potential and their capacity to differentiate into erythroid cells, B cells, T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

Haematologica 2024 April 5
Hematopoiesis is driven by molecular mechanisms that induce differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells and their progeny. This involves the activity of various transcription factors, such as members of the Hairy/Enhancer of Split (HES) family, and important roles for both HES1 and HES4 have been shown in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Here, we investigated the role of HES6 in human hematopoiesis using in vitro and in vivo models. Using bulk and scRNA-seq data, we show that HES6 is expressed during erythroid/megakaryocyte and pDC development, as well as in multipotent precursors and at specific stages of T- and B-cell development following preBCR and preTCR signalling, respectively. Consistently, knockdown of HES6 in cord blood-derived hematopoietic precursors in well-defined in vitro differentiation assays resulted in reduced differentiation of human hematopoietic precursors towards megakaryocytes, erythrocytes, pDCs, Band T-cells. In addition, HES6 knockdown HSPCs displayed reduced colony forming unit capacity in vitro and impaired potential to reconstitute hematopoiesis in vivo in a competitive transplantation assay. We demonstrate that loss of HES6 expression impacts cell cycle progression during erythroid differentiation and provide evidence for potential downstream target genes that impact these perturbations. Thus, our study uncovers new insights for a role of HES6 in human hematopoiesis.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app