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Effect of blind versus fluoroscopic guidance epidural blood patch in patients with intracranial hypotension.

Epidural blood patch (EBP)-the most effective treatment for intracranial hypotension (IH)-can be performed using the blind technique in the lateral position or under fluoroscopic guidance in the prone position. This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of EBP in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (sIH) and iatrogenic intracranial hypotension (iIH) when performed with the blind technique in the lateral decubitus position or fluoroscopic guidance in the prone position. We reviewed IH patients who underwent EBP between January 2015 and September 2019 in a single hospital and divided them into two groups according to the type of IH. Of the 84 included patients, 36 had sIH and 48 had iIH. We compared the effectiveness of EBP using the two methods in each group. There was no significant difference in the effect of EBP between the patients with iIH (p > 0.05). For patients with sIH, fluoroscopic guidance in the prone position technique showed better improvement than the blind technique in the lateral decubitus position (p < 0.05). We observed similar outcomes after blind EBP versus fluoroscopic guidance EBP in patients with iIH. However, procedure-dependent differences were observed in patients with sIH. For patients with sIH, it would be effective to consider fluoroscopic EBP first. Further study is needed to investigate interactions between method of EBP and other factors that affect the effectiveness of EBP.

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