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Saliva and tongue microbiota in burning mouth syndrome: An exploratory study of potential roles.

Oral Diseases 2024 April 4
OBJECTIVES: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic orofacial pain disorder with unclear etiology, in which the tongue is most commonly affected. This study aims to provide implication of the possible relationship between oral microbiota and the pathogenesis of BMS.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Saliva and tongue swabs of 15 primary BMS patients and 10 healthy controls were collected and assessed by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. The microbiota compositions were compared and bioinformatic analysis was conducted.

RESULTS: Differences in microbiota compositions between BMS patients and healthy controls were revealed in both saliva and tongue samples. In saliva, Streptococcus, Rothia, and Neisseria were the predominant genus at the taxonomic level in BMS patients. In tongue samples, Prevotella, Streptococcus, and Neisseria were the dominant genus at the taxonomic level in BMS patients. LEfSe analysis and linear discriminant analysis score showed that Actinobacteria were the predominant phylum in saliva, and Selenomonas were enriched in the dorsum of the tongue of BMS patients.

CONCLUSIONS: This study for the first-time reported saliva and tongue microbiota profiles were distinguished from that of healthy controls, indicating a necessity for further research on the possible relationship between oral microbes and the pathogenesis of BMS.

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