Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Minimizing neurovascular complications during image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of a cervical spinal aneurysmal bone cyst using protective doxycycline sclerotherapy: a case report.

BACKGROUND: Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are rare, locally aggressive bone tumors primarily observed in pediatric patients. Surgical curettage is the treatment of choice. Image-guided percutaneous cryoablation (CYOA) is a recently implemented alternative technique in cases not amenable to surgery. CYOA may be limited if the lesion is close to critical neurovascular structures. In this case report, a cervical spinal ABC was successfully treated using CYOA in combination with complementary and protective image-guided percutaneous doxycycline sclerotherapy (DS) to dissect and treat the portion of the lesion in contact with critical structures.

CASE DESCRIPTION: A 4-year-old male presented with a symptomatic ABC within the C5 vertebral body, which encompassed the right vertebral artery and contacted the right C5-C6 spinal cord and nerve roots. After ruling out surgery due to the proximity of critical neurovascular structures, treatment with CYOA was performed. However, subsequent follow-up showed recurrence in the part of the lesion contacting critical structures. A second approach was then decided, using DS to dissect and treat the most vulnerable portion and CYOA to treat the remaining tumor. Follow-up showed almost complete sclerosis of the lesion and total resolution of symptoms 3 years after treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: Using DS to dissect and treat the portion of the lesion in contact with critical neurovascular structures during CYOA treatment of a cervical spinal ABC allowed for a safe and effective approach in our case.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app