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Establishing an OCD Model in BALB/c Mice Using RU24969: A Molecular and Behavioural Study of Optimal Dose Selection.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a disabling disease characterized by distressing obsessions and repetitive compulsions. The etiology of OCD is poorly known, and mouse modeling allows to clarify the genetic and neurochemical basis of this disorder and to investigate potential treatments. This study evaluates the impact of the 5-HT1B agonist RU24969 on the induction of OCD-like behaviours in female BALB/c mice ( n = 30), distributed across five groups receiving varying doses of RU24969. Behavioural assessments, including marble test, tail suspension test, sucrose preference test, forced swim test, and nestlet shredding test, were conducted. Gene expression and protein quantitation of Gabra1 and serotonin transporter in mouse brain were also performed. Marble-burying behaviour increased significantly at high doses of RU24969 (15-20 mg/kg). The forced swimming test consistently showed elevated values at the same high concentrations, compared to the control. Altered reward-seeking behaviour was indicated by the sucrose preference test, notably at 15 and 20 mg/kg doses of RU24969. Nestlet shredding results did not show statistical significance among the tested animal groups. Gene expression analysis revealed reduced Gabra1 expression with increasing doses of RU, while serotonin transporter was not related to varying doses of RU24969. Western blotting corroborated these trends. The results underscore complex interactions between the serotonin system, GABAergic signaling, and OCD-relevant behaviours and suggest the use of intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg of RU24969 to induce OCD-like behaviour in BALB/c mouse models.

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