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Oral conditions are associated with salt taste disability among American adults.

Oral Diseases 2024 April 3
AIM: To explore the association between oral conditions and their interaction with salt taste disability among American adults.

METHODS: Data from the 2013-2014 NHANES cycle were used (n = 2373). The exposures were periodontitis, defined by the 2017 EFP-AAP classification, dental caries, missing teeth, and edentulism, as per the DMF-T index, and xerostomia. The outcome was salt taste disability, objectively assessed. Covariates included sex, age, educational level, poverty index, obesity, diabetes, smoking, alcohol consumption, and medications related to mouth dryness. Weighted multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between oral conditions and their interaction and salt taste disability.

RESULTS: Participants who reported xerostomia were more likely to have salt taste disability (OR 2.42; 95%CI 1.44-4.07), especially those older than 60 years (OR 3.63; 95%CI 1.72-7.63). Among participants aged 40-59, xerostomia increased the chance of salt taste disability; however, the confidence interval included the null value. The interactions between xerostomia and edentulism increased the chance of salt taste disability.

CONCLUSION: Oral conditions seem to influence the ability to taste salt. Dental professionals may help identify individuals with taste alterations and raise their awareness of the risk of systemic diseases that require the reduction of salt intake.

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