Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Prevalence of depression among subjects practicing aerobic vs. anaerobic exercise: a cross-sectional study.

BACKGROUND: As already proven in the literature, exercise positively affects mental health. However, the question regarding which type of exercise and what limit and time are sufficient to gain the maximum benefit still exists. The current study attempts to answer this question by comparing aerobic and anaerobic exercise in terms of the prevalence of depressive symptoms and their relationship with two different exercise categories.

METHODS: Walking, running, and cycling represent forms of aerobic exercise, while resistance training represents anaerobic sport. A total of 680 participants, 428 males and 252 females, met the inclusion criteria. Of those, 368 stated that walking and running was their main form of exercise, while 174 preferred cycling and 138 took part in resistance training.

RESULTS: The P value between the aerobic and anaerobic exercise groups in terms of the prevalence of depressive symptoms was 0.8, which is insignificant. This study also found that compliance, number of sessions, and time per session directly affected the prevalence of depressive symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS: The results show that all exercise may lead to individuals becoming less prone to depression; there is no advantage to undertaking aerobic exercise over anaerobic exercise. As long as there is good adherence and the appropriate number of sessions and amount of time, individuals should be encouraged to choose their type of exercise according to their needs and preferences.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app