Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Comparative study on electro-regeneration of antibiotic-laden activated carbons in reverse osmosis concentrate.

Water Research 2024 March 27
Electro-regeneration is emerging as a new technique to regenerate spent carbon adsorbents through an electrochemical process. In this study, sequential adsorption and electro-regeneration of ciprofloxacin (CIP)-laden carbon were investigated using both pristine and iron (Fe)-doped F400 activated carbon in distilled, deionized (DI) water and reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate water. The impact of reactor flow rate and sequential adsorption/electro-regeneration cycles on the regeneration efficiency were also evaluated. The results indicate that the breakthrough points for both adsorbents in DI water, where 100 % of the CIP molecules were adsorbed, occurred at around 7,800 bed volumes (BVs). Conversely, electro-regeneration for both adsorbents, where 94 % of the CIP molecules were desorbed, took place at 380 BVs. The main distinction between the two activated carbons lies in the initial range of BVs (<400 BVs).Fe doping on F400 appears to enhance its surface selectivity for CIP uptake, which can easily diffuse into the meso/macropore regions of Fe-doped F400. In contrast, pristine F400, being highly microporous, necessitated more contact time to fill its high-energy sites, resulting in a higher affinity for CIP adsorption. Over the four sequential adsorption/electro-regeneration cycles in DI water, a similar regeneration efficiency was observed at 190 BVs. As the flow rate increased from 2 to 6 mL/min, the CIP uptake on pristine F400 decreased in DI water, calculating 138, 74 and 57 mg/g for flow rates of 2, 4, and 6 mL/min, respectively. When the RO concentrate water was compared with DI water, the pristine F400 quickly reached saturation due to pore blockage caused by organic matter in RO concentrate. During electro-regeneration, up to 100 % of adsorbed CIP molecules were desorbed at around 120 BVs in RO concentrate, which is 3X faster than DI water. The effectiveness of this technology can be enhanced by implementing continuous flow systems, thereby improving the overall efficiency of CIP removal in RO concentrate.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app