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Impact of ozone therapy on mouse liver mitochondrial function and antioxidant system.

Biochimie 2024 March 27
Ozone therapy's efficacy might stem from the regulated and mild oxidative stress resulting from ozone's interactions with various biological elements. The present work aimed to characterize the hepatic mitochondrial response to ozone treatment and its relationship with the antioxidant system response. Two groups of mice were used: one control group and another injected intraperitoneally with an O3 /O2 mixture (80 ml/kg) for 5 days. Mitochondrial respiration supported by different substrates was significantly inhibited, as well as complexes I and II/III, but not complex IV. The analysis of the electron transport chain complex activity showed significant inhibitions in complexes I and II/III but not in complex IV. These inhibitions can prevent mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Additionally, there was a decline in glutathione content, unaccompanied by a rise in its oxidized form. The ozone-treated groups showed a significant increase in the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, while catalase and glutathione reductase experienced no significant alterations. Adenine nucleotides increased in the ozone group, but only the increase in adenosine diphosphate is significant, so the cell's energy charge is unaffected. This study shows that mitochondria may play a crucial role in ozone treatment. However, it also highlights the need for further studies to understand the molecular mechanism.

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