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Sex Differences in Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Treatment Among Young Israeli Patients Following Premature Acute Coronary Syndrome.

Introduction: Effective management of dyslipidemias is crucial for reducing morbidity and mortality among patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Sex differences in dyslipidemia management after premature ACS in Israeli patients have not been extensively studied. This study aimed to investigate potential disparities between men and women in managing dyslipidemia, considering current guidelines. Methods: This retrospective cohort study examined patients who were 55 years old or younger and admitted to Meir Medical Center for ACS from January 2018 to February 2019. The study aimed to evaluate the use of lipid-lowering therapy (LLT), measure the achievement of target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, and analyze the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) in both male and female patients. Results: The study included a total of 687 participants, of which 23.3% were identified as females. Upon discharge, ∼80% of the patients were prescribed high-intensity statins. After 1 year, it was observed that females had higher levels of LDL-C and lower rates of achieving target LDL-C levels (<70 and 55 mg/dL) as compared with males (45% vs. 54.6% and 30% vs. 42.2%, respectively). The use of non-statin LLT at the 1-year mark was minimal in both groups. Finally, it was found that the occurrence of MACCE was similar between males and females. Conclusion: Sex disparities in dyslipidemia management after a premature ACS were apparent, with females having higher LDL-C levels and lower rates of target achievement. Intervention is necessary to address these disparities and encourage greater use of non-statin LLT.

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