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The Relationship between Religious Well-Being, Existential Well-Being, Fear of Progression and Quality of Life in Patients with Cancer: The Mediating Role of Hope.

BACKGROUND: A cancer diagnosis can be psychologically challenging to individuals due to perceptions that the disease is potentially incurable truncating life expectancy. The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among religious well-being, existential well-being, fear of progression and quality of life in Iranian patients with cancer and to evaluate the potential mediating role of hope on these relationships.

METHODS: This study with predictive cross-sectional design was done in 2023. Data was gathered from 398 patients with cancer that was selected with accessible sampling method from cancer center of Mazandaran university of medical sciences (Sari, Iran). Study constructs included the religious and existential wellbeing, cancer fear of progression, Snyder Hope, and quality of life. Analysis of a Moment Structures (AMOS) software (v27) was utilized for all study analyses. Covariance based-structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to assess the mediating role of hope.

RESULTS: The mean age of patients with cancer was 49.14 (SD = 16.16). The results of the direct effect showed a significant positive relationship between religious well-being and hope (B = 0.164, p < .001), and between hope and quality of life (B = 0.212, p < 0.001). Also, significant negative relationship between fear of progression and hope (B = -0.147, p < 0.05) was founded.

CONCLUSION: A significant positive relationship between hope and quality of life, as well as religious well-being and hope, suggests the influential effects of hope and religious well-being on improving quality of life in patients with cancer. Negative relationships between fear of progression and hope conclude that managing fear of progression may be an important factor in increasing hope and improving quality of life in patients with cancer.

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