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Prognostic Values of CD8+, PARP, and EGFR on Overall Survival in Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the associations of CD8+, PARP, and EGFR expressions with two-year survival in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted in a national cancer center. All patients aged 18 years diagnosed with TNBC (2013-2017) were included and followed for 24 months or until the patients were deceased. Kaplan-Meier survival function and Cox proportional hazard model were applied for the analyses.

RESULTS: The study population was followed for 24 months (2,692 person-months, N = 126). At the end of the follow-up, 27 patients were deceased. The two-year mortality rate was 10 per 1,000 person-month. Kaplan-Meier graphs showed that after approximately one year of follow-up, poorer survival was seen in patients with low CD8+, positive PARP, and positive EGFR. The adjusted analysis found staging as the main predictor of overall survival in TNBC (HR = 7.20, 95% CI= 2.07 - 25.00).

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with low CD8+, positive PARP, and positive EGFR expressions seem to be associated with poorer overall survival in TNBC. After approximately one year of follow-up, higher survival was observed in patients with high CD8+, negative PARP, and negative EGFR. Staging remains the main predictor of TNBC survival. Therefore, early detection and treatment of TNBC are essential to improve survival.

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