Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms Regulating Blood Pressure and Kidney Dysfunction.

Hypertension 2024 March 29
The pioneering work of Dr Lewis K. Dahl established a relationship between kidney, salt, and high blood pressure (BP), which led to the major genetic-based experimental model of hypertension. BP, a heritable quantitative trait affected by numerous biological and environmental stimuli, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and is considered to be a primary modifiable factor in renal, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular diseases. Genome-wide association studies have identified monogenic and polygenic variants affecting BP in humans. Single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies have quantified the heritability of BP and the effect of genetics on hypertensive phenotype. Changes in the transcriptional program of genes may represent consequential determinants of BP, so understanding the mechanisms of the disease process has become a priority in the field. At the molecular level, the onset of hypertension is associated with reprogramming of gene expression influenced by epigenomics. This review highlights the specific genetic variants, mutations, and epigenetic factors associated with high BP and how these mechanisms affect the regulation of hypertension and kidney dysfunction.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app