Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Intramedullary arthrodesis of the knee joint with additional femoral neck screw to prevent periprosthetic fracture of the proximal femur. A case report.

Arthrodesis of the knee joint has proven effective in the treatment of chronic periprosthetic infections as well as in cases of previous multiple revision surgery after total knee replacement with insufficiency of the extensor apparatus. In this case report, we report on the use of a custom-made intramedullary arthrodesis nail of the knee joint following multiple revisions due to aseptic loosening after total knee replacement. Surgery was performed according to preoperative computerized planning. Microbiological and histological samples obtained intraoperatively showed no evidence of infection. Yet, the patient presented postoperatively with complete loss of active dorsiflexion of the ipsilateral foot. On one-year follow-up, the patient did not complain of any pain. The radiological findings one year after surgery showed no sign of loosening or any other pathological findings. The neurological lesion has completely recovered. The Harris Hip Score HHS improved from 24 (prior to implantation of the arthrodesis) to 75 on one-year follow-up, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index WOMAC improved from 86 to 20. The particularity of this case lies in the fact that an additional femoral neck screw was brought in to prevent periprosthetic fracture of the proximal femur. Careful preoperative planning as well as surgical performance were necessary to adjust the rotation of the femoral nail to allow adequate positioning of the femoral neck screw. Intramedullary arthrodesis of the knee is a suitable management option following multiple revision surgery after total knee replacement with insufficiency of the extensor apparatus. In many cases, an individual therapeutic plan is necessary ranging up to the use of custom-made implants.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app