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Effects of remimazolam tosilate on gastrointestinal hormones and gastrointestinal motility in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation: a randomized control trial.

PURPOSE: To investigate the impacts of remimazolam tosilate on gastrointestinal hormones and motility in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation.

METHODS: A total of 262 American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I or II patients, aged 18-65 years, scheduled for gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation, were randomly allocated into two groups (n = 131 each): the remimazolam tosilate group (Group R) and the propofol group (Group P). Patients in Group R received 0.2-0.25 mg/Kg remimazolam tosilate intravenously, while those in Group P received 1.5-2.0 mg/kg propofol intravenously. The gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed when the Modified Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scores were ≤3. The primary endpoints included the endoscopic intestinal peristalsis rating by the endoscopist; serum motilin and gastrin levels at fasting without gastrointestinal preparation (T0), before gastrointestinal endoscopy (T1), and before leaving the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (T2); and the incidences of abdominal distension during Post Anesthesia Care Unit.

RESULTS: Compared with Group P, intestinal peristalsis rating was higher in Group R (P < .001); Group R showed increased motilin and gastrin levels at T2 compared with Group P (P < .01). There was a rise in motilin and gastrin levels at T1 and T2 compared with T0 and at T2 compared with T1 in both groups (P < .01). The incidence of abdominal distension was lower in Group R (P < .05).

CONCLUSION: Compared with propofol used during gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation, remimazolam tosilate mildly inhibits the serum motilin and gastrin levels, potentially facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility.

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