Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Acute effects of various doses of nitrate-rich beetroot juice on high-intensity interval exercise responses in women: a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial.

BACKGROUND: This study investigated the acute effects of various doses of nitrate-rich beetroot juice on the responses to high-intensity interval exercise in women.

METHODS: A double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial was conducted with 13 recreationally active young women (age = 23 ± 2 years). All participants performed interval exercise (8 × 1-min bouts of cycling at 85% of peak power output [PPO] interspersed with 1-min active recovery at 20% of PPO) 2.5 h after consumption of the randomly assigned beetroot juice containing 0 mmol (placebo), 6.45 mmol (single-dose), or 12.9 mmol (double-dose) NO3-. The heart rate (HR), blood pressure, blood lactate, blood glucose, oxygen saturation, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and emotional arousal were assessed.

RESULTS: Nitrate supplementation significantly altered the HR and RPE responses across the three trials. The mean HR was lower in the single- and double-dose groups than in the placebo control group during both work intervals and recovery periods, as well as across the overall protocol (all p  < .05). The mean RPE was lower in the single- and double-dose groups than in the control group during recovery periods and across the overall protocol (all p  < .001). However, there was no significant difference in either HR or RPE between the single- and double-dose groups at any time point.

CONCLUSIONS: Acute nitrate ingestion led to significant decreases in the mean HR and RPE during high-intensity interval exercise, but no additional benefit was observed with higher nitrate content. These findings may assist practitioners in implementing more effective nitrate supplementation strategies during high-intensity interval exercise.

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