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Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase as a therapeutic approach for blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

Biochimie 2024 March 25
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a protective semi-permeable structure that regulates the exchange of biomolecules between the peripheral blood and the central nervous system (CNS). Due to its specialized tight junctions and low vesicle trafficking, the BBB strictly limits the paracellular passage and transcellular transport of molecules to maintain the physiological condition of brain tissues. BBB breakdown is associated with many CNS disorders. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a hydrolase enzyme that converts epoxy-fatty acids (EpFAs) to their corresponding diols and is involved in the onset and progression of multiple diseases. EpFAs play a protective role in the central nervous system via preventing neuroinflammation, making sEH a potential therapeutic target for CNS diseases. Recent studies showed that sEH inhibition prevented BBB impairment caused by stroke, hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, hyperglycemia and sepsis via regulating the expression of tight junctions. In this review, the protective actions of sEH inhibition on BBB and potential mechanisms are summarized, and some important questions that remain to be resolved are also addressed.

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